Diane Horrigan - RE/MAX  Trinity



Posted by Diane Horrigan on 1/31/2018

If you live in one state, but are trying to buy a home in another state, youíll face some obvious challenges. Thereís certain steps that you can take to help you get through the home buying process in another state. Whether youíre buying a vacation home, or are in a complete transition, youíll need to follow a few steps to make life easier for you. 


Know How Much Time You Have


First, youíll need to ask yourself when youíre planning to move. If you have flexibility and are planning a trip to the new state before you need to move, that paints a much different picture than a more rushed move. Consider:


  • The time it will take to sell your current home
  • When the closing will be on the new home


Keep that timeline in mind.


Youíll definitely want to hire a realtor to handle everything for you on both ends when youíre in this situation. A Realtorís knowledge and experience is definitely worth it to help you.


Get Your Finances In Order


Youíll need to apply for a loan on the home youíre buying in the new state. You should start by getting pre-approved for a mortgage in that state. You donít want all of your important paperwork to be buried in the midst of packing and moving. Also, youíll need to have that loan secured before you even head to the new state to close on the home. Everything should be in order. This situation may be more challenging for you than a typical home purchase. Since big purchases affect your credit score, youíll need to hold off on buying a car, furniture, or any major appliances that you may need. 


Get As Much Information As You Can


As a buyer who is from out of state, youíll need to do your homework. Maybe you have visited the state many times before. Perhaps you know nothing about it. The more you know ahead of time, the easier that your transition will be. Youíll need to find recommendations about which neighborhood to search in. Youíll also want to learn a bit more about the lifestyle the area provides for activities like dining, entertainment, and recreation. You can learn a lot in the internet, but talking to locals- even a local realtor- can help you to find the right spot to live in. 


Find The Right Realtors


Youíll need to find the right realtors in both your home state and the state that youíre moving to. The sellerís agent will assist you in getting your old home sold. From marketing the listing to home showings to sending you all of the paperwork that youíll need to sign, a sellerís agent is very valuable to someone who needs to move out of one state and into another. 


The buyerís agent can help you in your new state, communicating with you on new listings and advising you on the neighborhoods that youíll be the most happy in. Hiring these two realtors may be one of the most important steps in your feat of moving across two different states.


With the resources that are available online, moving from state-to-state isn't as hard as it may seem. Do your research for a smooth transition. Happy moving!





Posted by Diane Horrigan on 2/8/2017

After you have dotted your iís and crossed your tís to purchase a new home, you may have a million things running through your head. You probably want to buy new furniture and throw a house warming party, but thereís a few more pertinent things that you need to address just as you turn the key to enter your new home. The first thing that you should do when you move into a new house is create a checklist using the information in this blog post. 


Inspect Your Stuff


Moving can cause some damage to your furniture and boxed up things. Youíll want to take a look at everything thatís been moved into the house and make sure that itís completely in tact. If anything is damaged, youíll need to file a complaint with your moving company or replace any items that were broken by the move if you were responsible.


Turn On Your Utilities


Thereís a process in getting your utilities up and running. Youíll need to either have them turned on completely or just transfer their operations from the old owners to your name. 


Unpack


Itís important to unpack all of the essential things that youíll need at your new home. These items include sheets, pillows, blankets, kitchen items and coffee makers.


Organize


Moving into a home is a clean slate for you and your organizational skills. This is the time for you to get organized and put everything in a proper place. No one wants to move into a new home and immediately have a giant mess to clean up! Take your time and put everything in the right place. If you need to purchase shelving or other organizational tools, do so at this time to help you get off on the right foot.  


Inspect The House


Itís important to check out your house from top to bottom one more time shortly after moving in. If there are any problems that werenít there during the home inspection or any major issues that weren't revealed, youíll need to address them at this time.


Check For Pests


If there are any pests like mice or bugs in your home as you first move in, youíll need to take care of this ASAP. You donít want to have an infestation on your hands just as you move into your new home. You can either take on the problem yourself or call an exterminator for professional help.  


Secure The Home


From door locks to window safety, youíll want to check all around to ensure that your new home is safe and secure for you and your family. Thereís nothing more important the the health and safety of those you love, so you want to be sure that they are indeed protected from accidents and crime.           


Enjoy Your New Life!


Moving into a new home is very exciting. Youíll want to take the time to enjoy your new neighborhood and new surroundings. This also means taking care of your own well-being and your financial well-being as well. Make a budget so that all of your monthly payments are made promptly. Now that you have ďtaken care of business,Ē you can enjoy life!     





Posted by Diane Horrigan on 10/14/2015

Moving can be stressful.†The best way to not get overwhelmed is to have an organized plan and a step-by-step timeline. A little preparation will help make the move go a lot smoother. Here is a checklist to help keep you on track: 60 Days Before You Move

  • Sort and Purge-Go through every room, decide what needs to come with you and what can go. Make piles of things to throw away and things to donate.
  • Plan a Yard Sale-Start planning a yard sale to reduce the amount of stuff you need†to move. Some extra money for the move will also come in handy.
  • Hire a Mover-Contact at least three moving companies. On-site estimates are better than over the phone or internet estimates. Get each estimate in writing, and make sure it has a USDOT (U.S. Department of Transportation) number on it.
  • Create a Moving Binder-Store all of your move-related paperwork (checklists, contracts, receipts) in a binder. You may also want to inventory all of your items with photos or lists.
Six Weeks Before Your Move
  • Get Packing Supplies-Determine how many packing supplies youíll need and designate a room where you can begin to store and organize.
  • Take Measurements-If possible get room dimensions of your new home. Make sure large pieces of furniture will fit.† Donít forget to take measurements for appliances too.
30 Days Before Your Move
  • Confirm with Mover-Check with your mover the details of your move.
  • Start Packing-Begin packing out-of-season clothes and unnecessary items.
  • Label-Make sure to label boxes with what rooms the boxes will go in at your new home.
  • Start/Stop Utilities-Make arrangements to connect and disconnect your cable, internet and utilities.
  • Change your Address- Contact or visit your local Post Office to obtain a Change of Address form. You can also obtain this form online at http://www.usps.com.
  • Make Notifications- Change your address to the following: registry of motor vehicles, banks, schools, friends & family, insurance companies, doctors and specialists, cell phone providers, credit card companies and magazine and newspapers.
  • Contact Service ProvidersóNotify landscapers, cleaning services that†you are moving, and look for new ones in your new hometown.
Two Weeks Before Your Move
  • Call Locksmith- Have your new homeís locks changed on moving day or before.
  • Arrange Services- Have a cleaning company prepare the new home before you arrive and tidy the old home after you leave. Arrange for carpet cleaning too.
  • Pack the bulk of your items.
  • Start Cleaning-Begin cleaning any rooms in your house that have been emptied, such as closets, basements or attics.
One Week Before Your Move
  • Pack Suitcases- Finish your general packing a few days before your moving date. Pack suitcases for everyone in the family with enough clothes to wear for a few days.
  • Gather Keys- Organize all keys, alarm codes and garage door openers so that you can be prepared to hand them over to the new owner or real estate agent.
A Few Days Before Your Move
  • Defrost the Freezer- Empty, clean and defrost the freezer at least 24 hours before moving day.
  • Make Payment Plans-†You will need to make sure you have made arrangements to pay the mover and have a tip (usually 10%-15%).
Moving Day
  • List Contact Info- Write out a list for your movers of things theyíll need: phone numbers, exact moving address and maps.
  • Take Inventory- Before the movers leave, sign the bill of lading/inventory list and keep a copy.
  • Walk-Through- Do a walk-through of your new home with your real estate agent.
  • Layout New Home- Tape names to doors to assist movers in placing furniture and boxes.
  • Have Director- Arrange for someone to direct the movers at your new home.
   





Posted by Diane Horrigan on 11/12/2014

Friendly Moving CompanyIf you've never heard of a moving scam, then consider yourself lucky. But many people across America are falling victim to these scams. Moving scammers have a multitude of ways that they can take advantage of you. The main scam seems to be packing all of your household items into their truck, and then adding on exorbitant additional fees in transit, effectively holding your items hostage until you pay up. Less popular scams involve unlicensed movers posing as legitimate companies, by-the-hour rates where you are charged even while no work is being done, and in the rare case, a sham company showing up, packing up all of your possessions, and driving away, never to be heard from again.†To minimize your risk, follow a few simple guidelines.

  • Use a local, reputable business.
  • Never do business with a broker. Always do business with the actual moving company.
  • Always be sure that the company is licensed to do the work they are to be performing. This includes getting the business's full name and address, motor carrier (MC) and Department of Transportation (DOT) license numbers, phone numbers and an e-mail address. If a company cannot provide you access to these things, then move on.
  • Be sure to use a company with actual employees, and not day laborers. If they use day laborers, there is a chance that they may not have the proper insurance in place.
Additionally, be sure to get any estimates in paper form. They are legally obligated to do so, and if they balk at the idea, then it's time for you to move on, and find a company that will play by the rules.